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Dead By Words

Love horror movies and TV? So do we. Walk down our track and enter our cabin of horrors…

Month

March 2017

Review – Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992)

It is happening again.

And it happened before – in 1992 – when David Lynch directed the feature length movie of the final days of Laura Palmer’s (Sheryl Lee’s) life. It’s as disturbing, quirky and ‘Lynch’ as they come, with central Twin Peaks characters making welcome appearances and some pretty strange cameos from Chris Isaak, Kiefer Sutherland and David Bowie to name but a few.

We find out more about Laura’s sad, troubled life and Fire Walk with Me is explicit about who ‘Bob’ is, what he does and what happens behind closed doors in seemingly perfect middle class America. Lynch puts the fear into nice houses and lawns, comfortable lounges and we’re once again looking out for Bob springing up from behind the sofa or the corner of Laura’s room. The significance of the ceiling fan also comes into play.

As described in ‘The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer’ book, we get to see exactly what Laura is into and how best friend Donna (played in the movie by Moira Kelly, not Lara Flynn Boyle – who declined to return) tries to find out and nearly gets sucked into herself. There’s a chilling moment reminding us where Agent Cooper  (Kyle MacLachlan) is, when Laura sees a bloodied Annie (Heather Graham) in bed with her and she delivers a message. *shudder*. And of course we visit the Black Lodge to meet The Man From Another Place (Michael J. Anderson).

Fire Walk with Me stands up solidly by itself in the Twin Peaks family and is a great watch. The final 20 minutes alone are horrific and deeply upsetting but leave you feeling that Laura is okay now. How and when we meet her again in May 2017 is yet to be revealed but we can’t wait.

GORE RATING: 2/5

SCARES: 4/5

DISTURBIA: 4/5

RATING: 8/10

Watch it for: Sheryl Lee gets the attention she deserves 

Watch out for: Bloody BOB – of course! 

 

 

Review: Train to Busan (2016)

You won’t have been on any zombie journey like Train to Busan; this South Korean horror film is fast-paced, with excellent character development, real emotion and some of the most friggin’ terrifying, super speedy zombies ever. This isn’t a slow ride.

Seok-woo (Gong Yoo) is a divorced fund manager who agrees to take his young daughter Soo-an (an INCREDIBLE Kim Su-an) to see her mother in Busan as her birthday wish. They board the KTX (Korea Train Express) from Seoul, just as reports of mass rioting and people getting a little bit bitey break. Soo-an even witnesses a platform guard being jumped on and tackled to the floor as the train departs. And there’s an unwanted guest onboard too.

The tension builds nicely, with plot development of the heroes to cheer on – those you want to survive – and probably the most evil, vile character you’ll be wishing to become zombie fodder. The zombie outbreak on the train is immense as passenger after passenger are attacked, and there’s some standout scenes where you’ll be kicking yourself for not seeing this movie on the big screen – the train crash/survivors running towards the new train to board and the zombies chasing after them, is one such brilliant moment.

At the heart of the film is Seok-woo and Soo-an’s relationship – he is corporate, too busy trying to make money but for the benefit of his daughter, and Soo-an is vulnerable but kindhearted and looks out for others on the train. You’ll also be cheering on pregnant Seong-kyeong (Jung Yu-mi) and her hero husband Sang-hwa (Ma Dong-seok); Sang-hwa fights the zombies with his own hands, and he’s a complete badassssss.

Throughout the action, the mild gore and the scares, we then come to a very emotional ending. We never thought we’d cry at a zombie film. Little did we know.

WATCH IT NOW. IT’S THATTTTTT GOOD.

GORE RATING: 2/5 pretty mild

SCARES: 4/5

DISTURBIA: 3/5

RATING: 10/10

Watch it for: It’s world-class and one of the finest in its genre

Watch out for: When the train attendant goes to comfort the ill young woman. OH-OH 

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